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to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)